Golf in Scotland

Scotland has excellent golfing. We have a long season, with links courses available for play most of the year.

In the summer we enjoy daylight well into the evening, making it possible to play a full round of golf after an early dinner.

To make sure you enjoy your golf holiday it's best to know some of the local etiquette and traditions. Most courses have fairly strict dress code and electric buggies are still the exception rather than the norm. We've put together some notes so you know what to expect.

When to play

What to wear

On the course

Carrying your clubs


Or consult our Frequently Asked Questions


When to play

The golfing season generally starts at the beginning of April and runs to mid-October. Links courses may be played throughout most of the year.

The best weather is usually found in May and September, but Scotland has a famously unreliable climate, so you need to be ready for all types of weather.

From mid May to end July it is not fully dark until 10pm at night, so your golf does not always need to be played first thing in the morning.

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What to wear

Our average summer temperatures range between 60-74F (15-23C) and sunshine can not be guaranteed, so we recommend you bring warm outer clothing such as a sweater or a jumper as well as golf waterproofs. It can often be windy on the coastal courses, so a windproofed outer layer is worth keeping in your golf bag.

All the clubs on our itineraries have dress codes, which will be enforced. Jeans, T-shirts, trainers and collarless shirts should not be worn either on the course or in the clubhouse. Greg Norman and Tiger Woods may be able to wear collarless shirts in major competitions, but we don't recommend you try it!

Some of the more traditional clubs will insist that gentleman wear a jacket, collar and tie in certain parts of the clubhouse - these clubs tend to have a strong tradition and you should view this as part of the overall experience. We will clearly identify on your itinerary if you require to bring a jacket and tie to use any of the course clubhouses.

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When on the course

All visitors are expected to be familiar with standard course etiquette and play at a reasonable pace. Some of the courses on our itineraries employ rangers to check on the progress of all players and help avoid slow play. They may also ask visitors who do not treat the course with respect, or who do not behave in an acceptable manner, to leave the course.

Where a course is long or a particular challenge play will tend to be around 4 hours. However many of the shorter courses will view this as a slow round and would expect 18 holes to be played in closer to three hours.

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Carrying your clubs

Pull trolleys are available at most clubs for a very modest fee, so you do not need to bring one with you. If you want to go for the full experience, and get advice as you play, caddies can be hired at most courses, but they do need to be booked well in advance. Let us know if you would like us to arrange caddies for you at any of the courses.

An increasing number of courses have electric buggies available for hire, by the round or by the day, but walking is still the norm in Scotland. Some courses simply will not allow electric buggies or will only permit them if you have a medical certificate. If it is necessary for you to ride in a buggy, please let us know at the time of your initial enquiry so we can ensure only courses where this is possible are included in your tour.

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Go to our Frequently Asked Questions for some more information

Scotscraig Golf Club in Fife The links at Kilspindie, East Lothian Kilmarnock Barassie golf course